Can you legally buy gabapentin online

Neurontin (gabapentin) prescription is not a controlled substance and you can legally buy Gabapentin online with a US licensed doctor prescription.

Our doctors are all US licensed doctors and it will be printed in the label of your prescription bottle.

What you need to do is to answer the questions very carefully and honestly and our USA licensed doctors will decide whether to send you Gabapentin prescription or not.

Yes, you can get a Neurontin (gabapentin) prescription online, in most states, following a virtual consultation with a doctor.

But our website require that you should have already taken Gabapentin before. If it is your first time to take Gabapentin, we will not send you Gabapentin prescription.

You must have your local doctor prescribed a Gabapentin prescription and you think Gabapentin is good for your disease and you can refill your Gabapentin here in our website.

 

If you have shingles pain or seizures, Neurontin may be able to help you and thanks to modern technology you can get a Neurontin prescription online.

Let’s talk about how you can get a Neurontin prescription online as well as what it is, what it does, what side effects or complications you could experience, and our Neurontin prescription policy.

Where Can I Not Get Neurontin Prescribed Online?

It’s important to note that Neurontin (gabapentin) has been classified as a controlled substance in 5 states and therefore cannot be prescribed online in these locations.

These states are:

      • Kentucky
      • West Virginia
      • Virginia
      • Tennessee
      • Michigan

 

The Role of Gabapentin in Pain Management

Opioids, non‐steroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), antidepressants, and anticonvulsants are used as pharmacological agents to treat pain. However, no single class of drugs has been found to be effective in all types of pain, presumably because pain syndromes involve different mechanisms.

In addition, each of the currently available drugs is associated with adverse effects, some of which are potentially serious or life‐threatening such as idiosyncratic or toxic reactions.

Traditionally, the treatment of neuropathic pain has involved anticonvulsants, such as carbemazepine, valproic acid and phenytoin, and tricyclic antidepressants, such as amitriptyline and nortriptyline and doxepin. The main disadvantages of the anticonvulsants are their potential for drug interactions via the induction of hepatic enzymes, or resulting from inhibition of hepatic enzymes by other drugs. Minor side‐effects such as sedation, ataxia, vertigo and diplopia are associated with carbemazepine and phenytoin, whereas, anorexia, nausea, vomiting and tremor are associated with valproic acid. Chronic phenytoin use may cause peripheral neuropathy (30%) and gingival hyperplasia (20%), and fetal hydantoin syndrome if administered during pregnancy. Carbemazepine can cause chronic diarrhoea or the syndrome of inappropriate ADH secretion, and rarely aplastic anaemia, thrombocytopaenia, hepatocellular jaundice and cardiac arrhythmias.

Tricyclic antidepressants also cause side‐effects that can be troublesome or potentially dangerous, such as anticholinergic effects (dry mouth, blurred vision, urinary retention, ileus), sedation, orthostatic hypotension, tachycardia and atrio‐ventricular conduction disturbances. Such adverse effects are likely to reduce the tolerance of this group of drugs in elderly or unwell patients. Some subgroups of patients with painful neuropathy such as diabetes may also have autonomic neuropathy and may not tolerate the orthostatic hypotension associated with tricyclic antidepressants.

With increasing evidence of the efficacy of gabapentin in a wide variety of pain syndromes, especially neuropathic pain, gabapentin may be potentially useful because of its relative freedom from serious adverse effects, its lack of interactions with other drugs and its lack of potential for causing drug dependence.

A comparison of the evidence available of efficacy and toxicity for anticonvulsants (gabapentin, phenytoin and carbemazepine) and antidepressants (tricyclic antidepressants and SSRIs) in patients with diabetic neuropathy and postherpetic neuralgia has recently been made by Collins et al. [129] These two neuropathic pain conditions were chosen according to strict diagnostic criteria. Although two previous systematic reviews of anticonvulsants and antidepressants in diabetic neuropathy showed no significant difference in efficacy or adverse effects between the two drug classes [130, 131], Collins et al. found that when data from randomised controlled trials for both diabetic neuropathy and postherpetic neuralgia were pooled, the NNT for at least 50% pain relief was identical for both classes of drugs. When gabapentin was compared with other anticonvulsants, there was no significant difference in efficacy.

The NNT for gabapentin was 3.4 compared with 2.2 for phenytoin/carbemazepine. The number needed to harm (NNH, defined as the number needed to harm one patient from the therapy) for minor adverse effects was 2.7 for both antidepressants and anticonvulsants. Collins et al. used two trials to provide data on minor adverse effects for gabapentin and two trials for phenytoin. The NNH (minor adverse effects) was 2.6 similar to that of gabapentin and 3.2 for phenytoin. The NNH (major adverse effects) for the tricyclic antidepressants was 17, and no significant difference in the incidence of major adverse effects was found between anticonvulsants and placebo.

Collins et al. suggested that the difference in the incidence of major adverse effects can be compared by using the ratio between treatment specific benefit and treatment specific harm (defined as the number of patients needed to experience at least 50% benefit for one to experience a major adverse effect that warranted discontinuation of treatment). The ratio for gabapentin was 6 compared with an average of 8 for all anticonvulsants, and 6 for all antidepressants. As adverse data were pooled from both diabetic and postherpetic neuralgia studies, methodological factors and heterogenicity in these data may limit the validity and robustness of these ratios. The spectrum of the pain and short study duration tend to underestimate the treatment effect, whereas the small sample size of the studies overestimate the treatment effect.

The above evidence suggests that gabapentin is as efficacious at treating neuropathic pain with no significant difference in minor adverse effects and a low propensity for serious adverse effects compared with other anticonvulsants and antidepressants. Therefore, gabapentin is a useful agent in the multimodal approach in the management of neuropathic pain.

How is Gabapentin Supplied and Stored ?

NEURONTIN (gabapentin) capsules, tablets, and oral solution are supplied as follows:

100 mg capsules:

White hard gelatin capsules printed with “PD” on the body and “Neurontin/100 mg” on the cap; available in:
Bottles of 100: NDC 0071-0803-24

300 mg capsules:

Yellow hard gelatin capsules printed with “PD” on the body and “Neurontin/300 mg” on the cap; available in:
Bottles of 100: NDC 0071-0805-24
Unit dose 50’s: NDC 0071-0805-40

400 mg capsules:

Orange hard gelatin capsules printed with “PD” on the body and “Neurontin/400 mg” on the cap; available in:
Bottles of 100: NDC 0071-0806-24
Unit dose 50’s: NDC 0071-0806-40

600 mg tablets:

White elliptical film-coated scored tablets debossed with “NT” and “16” on one side; available in:
Bottles of 100: NDC 0071-0513-24

800 mg tablets:

White elliptical film-coated scored tablets debossed with “NT” and “26” on one side; available in:
Bottles of 100: NDC 0071-0401-24

250 mg per 5 mL oral solution:

Clear colorless to slightly yellow solution; each 5 mL of oral solution contains 250 mg of gabapentin; available in:
Glass bottles containing 470 mL: NDC 0071-2012-23
Bottles containing 470 mL: NDC 0071-2012-44

Store NEURONTIN Tablets and Capsules at 25°C (77°F); excursions permitted between 15°C to 30°C (59°F to 86°F) [see USP Controlled Room Temperature].

Store NEURONTIN Oral Solution refrigerated, 2°C to 8°C (36°F to 46°F).

Gabapentin 800mg with G13 imprint

Gabapentin 800mg with G13 label
Gabapentin 800mg with G13 label

Labelers / Repackagers

Labelers / Repackagers

NDC Code Labeler / Repackager
68462-0127 Glenmark Pharmaceuticals Inc.
54868-5195 Physicians Total Care Inc. (repackager)

Gabapentin

Imprint
G 13
Strength
800 mg
Color
White
Size
19.00 mm
Shape
Elliptical / Oval
Availability
Prescription only
Drug Class
Gamma-aminobutyric acid analogs
Pregnancy Category
C – Risk cannot be ruled out
CSA Schedule
Not a controlled drug
Labeler / Supplier
Glenmark Generics Inc.
Inactive Ingredients
corn starch, copovidone, poloxamer 407, magnesium stearate, titanium dioxide, magnesium silicate, polysorbate 80, water

Note: Inactive ingredients may vary.

What is gabapentin?

Gabapentin is an anti-epileptic drug, also called an anticonvulsant. It affects chemicals and nerves in the body that are involved in the cause of seizures and some types of pain.

Gabapentin is used together with other medicines to treat partial seizures in adults and children at least 3 years old.

Gabapentin is also used to treat neuropathic pain (nerve pain) caused by herpes virus or shingles (herpes zoster) in adults.

Use only the brand and form of gabapentin your doctor has prescribed. Check your medicine each time you get a refill to make sure you receive the correct form.

The Gralise brand of gabapentin is indicated for the management of neuropathic pain only. It is not used for epilepsy.

Horizant is used to treat nerve pain and restless legs syndrome (RLS).

The Neurontin brand is used to treat seizures in adults and children who are at least 3 years old, in addition to neuropathic pain.

Gabapentin is used to treat Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

What is Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: A common complication of diabetes mellitus in which nerves are damaged as a result of hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels)

Not many people are aware of the medical condition that is known as Diabetic Neuropathy however more and more people are being diagnosed with having it, and if you have been recently diagnosed with Diabetic Neuropathy then you will need to start to take drug to help manage and control that condition.

Causes of Neuropathic Pain

Exposure to drugs, alcohol, toxins Neuropathic Pain Surgical procedures/ Amputation Traumatic Nerve injury/ compression Metabolic disturbance Viral infection Neuropathic pain is a disease, like myocardial infarction is a disease. Myocardial infarction may be caused by smoking, or hypertension, or diabetes. Multiple different things contribute to the cause of myocardial infarction, but myocardial infarction is the disease. Similarly, neuropathic pain is a disease, and this slide shows many of the different conditions that can result in neuropathic pain.

But the pain is nonprotective. It is something that persists and behaves separately as a disease itself. Cancer related (disease or treatment Vascular related neurodegenerative Nutritional deficiency

The best drug you can take is the fast acting Gabapentin and one of the main reasons why many people who do have Diabetic Neuropathy will take that drug is that it is not only fast acting as mentioned but it is also a very low cost drug to purchase too.

Drugs associated with Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

If you do want to take Gabapentin to treat diabetic neuropathy then please do be aware there can be some side effects, and before you make a purchase of Gabapentin you will be best advised to find out what the side effect of Gabapentin when taking it to treat diabetic neuropathy, and if at any time you start to experience any of those side effects then please seek the advice of a Doctor or a medical professional.

Pharmacologic Treatment for Neuropathic pain

Lidocaine patch 5%, capsaicinOpioidsOxycodone, Tramadol, Fentanyl, Morphine, HydrocodoneAntidepressantsTricyclic AntidepressantsAmitryptiline, Nortryptiline, Desipramine, Imipramine, DoxepinSelective Noredrinaline reuptake inhibitorsDuloxetine, VenlafaxineAnticonvulsantsCarbamazepine, Valproate, Lamotrigine, Topiramate, Gabapentin, Pregabalin